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Paleo Oven-Roasted Beef Casserole

Louise Hendon | May 1
Paleo Oven-Roasted Beef Casserole #paleo https://paleoflourish.com/paleo-oven-roasted-beef-casserole

Beef stew is a classic for a reason but there is a lot more you can do with stew beef. When the weather starts to turn warm, put away the stew pot and make this Paleo oven-roasted beef casserole instead. It’s cooked in the oven so there’s no need to stand over the stove waiting for the beef to cook. Plus, the addition of zucchini, peppers, and tomatoes lightens up the hearty beef making this a perfect dinner for those spring days when there’s an undeniable chill despite the sun. It’s the best of both worlds, meaty beef to keep you satisfied with just enough veggies to remind you that warmer days are ahead!

What is Stew Beef and How Should You Cook It?

Stew beef can refer to a number of different cuts of meat. In fact, if you buy a package labelled “stew beef” at the store, you’re probably buying various odds and ends from other cuts. Because stew is cooked for so long, “stew beef” can be made from the most economical cuts.

If you would like to use a pieces from single cut of beef for your stew, chuck roast, rump roast, and pot roast are all good choices. Steer clear of cuts with a lot of marbling (like a steak) because they will become dry and chewy when cooked for hours.

What Purpose Do Vegetables Serve in a Casserole (and How Can You Substitute)

Different veggies serve different purposes. Read on to find out why we’re including certain veggies and how to substitute them without sacrificing the balance of flavors.

  • Aromatics – Onions, Fennel, Shallots, Celery
  • Bulk and Texture – Zucchini, Eggplant, Summer Squash, Sweet Potato, Carrot, Broccoli
  • Acidity and Contrast – Tomatoes, Bell Peppers, Peas, Tomatillo, Beets, Chard Stems

More Paleo-Friendly Ways to Use Beef (That Aren’t Your Typical Beef Stew)

  • Asian Garlic Beef Noodles – These “better than takeout” noodles can be made with stew beef or any other beef chopped into small cubes.
  • Crockpot Beef Plantain Stew (Caribbean Style) – As you may have guessed from the name, this is not your typical American beef stew. The plantains and collard greens give this stew an authentic Caribbean flavor that distinguishes it from your typical meat and potatoes meal.
  • Pressure Cooker Beef Curry Stew – A generous serving of curry powder and coconut milk give this beef stew a satisfying spice that is anything but ordinary.

Paleo Oven-Roasted Beef Casserole #paleo https://paleoflourish.com/paleo-oven-roasted-beef-casserole

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Paleo Oven-Roasted Beef Casserole #paleo https://paleoflourish.com/paleo-oven-roasted-beef-casserole

Paleo Oven-Roasted Beef Casserole


  • Author: Louise Hendon
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 3 hours
  • Total Time: 3 hours 10 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Dinner, Entree
  • Cuisine: American

Description

A good casserole is a classic comfort food. Enjoy this low carb beef one any night of the week.


Ingredients

  • 1 lb (450 g) beef stew cubes
  • 2 Tablespoons (30 ml) avocado oil, to cook with 
  • 8 cloves of garlic, minced 
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) bone broth
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced 
  • 1 zucchini, diced 
  • 2 tomatoes, diced 
  • 2 red onion, sliced
  • Salt and pepper, to taste 

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300 F (150 C).
  2. First, you’ll need to saute the beef in the avocado oil on high heat.  Brown the cubes all over and season lightly with salt. (You can also do this in a dutch oven.)
  3. Add the beef, garlic, and bone broth to a large casserole dish or dutch oven.
  4. Bake covered with foil for 2 hours.  Then uncover and cook for 45 minutes.
  5. Add all the vegetables in and stir in with the meat mixture.  Bake for 15 more minutes. Add additional salt and pepper, to taste.

Notes

All nutritional data are estimated and based on per serving amounts.

Nutrition

  • Calories: 398
  • Sugar: 3 g
  • Fat: 31 g
  • Carbohydrates: 8 g
  • Fiber: 2 g
  • Protein: 20 g